Thursday, February 4, 2016

Basil Chicken Wing Beer Curry (咖哩紫蘇啤酒鷄翼, Gaa3 Lei1 Zi2 Sou1 Be1 Zau2 Gai1 Jik6)

Copyright © 2016 Douglas R. Wong. All rights reserved.
Beer and curry seem to go together, so why not cook a stew with the two ingredients? The recipe could have just as easily used garam masala powder to make a spicier version of this dish. The amount of the curry powder can also be customized to suit your tastes, so feel free to increase or decrease the amount used in the recipe. Chicken wings (midjoint or drumette pieces) are ideal for this curry dish because they cook quickly. All the ingredients, except for the corn starch slurry and basil leaves, are added to a Dutch oven in the beginning to make this quick cooking one pot dish.
Enjoy!

Sunday, January 31, 2016

Black Bean Garlic Sauce Snow Pea Lamb (蒜蓉豆豉醬荷蘭豆羊肉, Syun3 Jung4 Dau6 Si6 Zoeng3 Ho4 Laan4 Dau6 Joeng4 Juk6)

Copyright © 2016 Douglas R. Wong. All rights reserved.
Here’s another lamb dish using lamb loin chop meat. I used this cut of meat in two previous recipes: Black Bean Chili Oil Lamb with Bean Curd Sticks (黑豆辣椒油腐竹羊肉, Hak1 Dau6 Laat6 Ziu1 Jau4 Fu6 Zuk1 Joeng4 Juk6) and Black Bean Chili Oil Snow Pea Lamb Chow Mein (黑豆辣椒油荷蘭豆羊扒炒麵, Hak1 Dau6 Laat6 Ziu1 Jau4 Ho4 Laan4 Dau6 Joeng4 Paa4 Caau2 Min6). More common (and cheaper) cuts of lamb can be substituted, such as lamb leg or shoulder. Lamb loin chops have two distinct pieces of meat separated by a bone as in a beef T-bone steak. The larger piece of meat is the loin and the smaller is the tenderloin. The two pieces of meat need to be removed from the bone, and then the loin and tenderloin pieces cut thinly using a very sharp knife. Meat from the lamb loin chop is very tender and even though there’s more work involved to prepare the meat for this dish, it’s worth the effort to make this dish if you can get the lamb loin chops for a decent price, otherwise use meat from the lamb leg or shoulder. You’ll need to purchase about 1½ lb. (750 g.) of lamb loin chops to get about ¾ lb. (375 g.) of meat after trimming.
Enjoy!

Saturday, January 23, 2016

Seafood Winter Melon Soup (海鮮冬瓜羹, Hoi2 Sin1 Dung1 Gwaa1 Gang1)

Copyright © 2016 Douglas R. Wong. All rights reserved.
I made this tasty soup for my family’s 2015 Christmas dinner. The soup is loaded with lots of seafood and is a special occasion type dish. The other main ingredient is winter melon. Winter melon is really a gourd used mainly in soups, but I’ve also used it in these stir fry recipes: Chicken and Rock Shrimp with Winter Melon (冬瓜蝦仁雞, Dung1 Gwaa1 Haa1 Jan4 Gai1), Winter Melon with Dried Shrimp (冬瓜蝦米, Dung1 Gwaa1 Haa1 Mai5), and Stir Fried Beef with Winter Melon (冬瓜炒牛肉, Dung1 Gwaa1 Caau2 Ngau4 Juk6). So winter melon can be quite versatile, but cooks quickly and becomes mushy if overcooked.
Unfortunately I wasn’t able to use fresh local crabs due to a deadly neurotoxin contamination, so I used imported (from another state) freshly cooked crab from my local grocery store. I used the meat from two cooked Dungeness crabs and that produced about 1 lb. (500 g.) of meat. If you’re not fortunate enough to have freshly cooked crabs available, canned or frozen crab can be used. Crab is not the only seafood that can be used, and abalone or sea cucumber can be used as substitutes.
The soup stock was made using the Bone Soup (, Tong1) recipe. You can used a prepared soup stock, but the taste of the soup is heavily dependent upon the quality of the ingredients. So if you’re going to all the trouble and expense to make this soup, you should make your own soup stock. The last Chinese character in the recipe’s name, (gang1), signifies that this is a thick soup. A thick soup means that a corn starch solution is added to thicken the soup. The amount of thickener added to the soup depends upon personal preference, but the soup should be thicker than a normal soup and not thicker than a very thick gravy.
Enjoy!

Monday, January 11, 2016

Shredded Tofu Jellyfish Salad (白豆腐絲海蜇沙律, Baak6 Dau6 Fu6 Si1 Hoi2 Zit3 Saa1 Leot6)

Copyright © 2016 Douglas R. Wong. All rights reserved.
Happy New Year! For the first recipe of 2016, here’s a tasty salad I made for my family’s 2015 Christmas dinner. It’s actually quite simple to make, consisting mainly of opening packages and cutting the fresh ingredients. The two notable ingredients are instant jellyfish and shredded tofu.
I’ve used instant jellyfish previously, Cucumber and Jellyfish Salad (Ceng1 Gwaa1 Hoi2 Zit3 Saa1 Leot6, 青瓜海蜇沙律), while the recipes are similar, the main ingredient for this dish is shredded tofu. Instant jellyfish comes in a package ready to use (hence the “instant” name). If I translated the Chinese correctly, it’s “jellyfish noodles”. The traditional method to prepare jellyfish is to soak dried salted jellyfish to rehydrate it before cutting into strips (at least a two day effort with a couple of water changes to remove the salt). So you see why packaged instant jellyfish is preferable. The jellyfish and cucumber give this dish a nice crunchy texture.
Shredded tofu is also packaged and looks like noodles. I’ve also used shredded tofu in another (cooked) recipe, Baby Bok Choy Sprouts with Shredded Tofu (白菜苗豆腐絲, Baak6 Coi3 Miu4 Dau6 Fu6 Si1). The tofu needs to be parboiled before using (follow the instructions on the package), but other than that, there’s no other cooking needed before assembling the salad. The rest of the fresh salad ingredients are either cut or come already cut into small strips. Shredded tofu also comes marinated (five-spice), but the “noodles” are larger and could be substituted for the non-marinated version to give the salad another added taste.
Enjoy!

Thursday, December 31, 2015

Amaretto Fudge Cheesecake with Kahlua Chocolate Cookie Crust and Ganache

Copyright © 2015 Douglas R. Wong, all rights reserved.
This will be my last post for 2015. So my last recipe is a dessert, which I rarely make, made for my family’s 2015 Christmas dinner. So we’ll end the year on a sweet note and as we enter 2016, best wishes to you and your family for the coming New Year. I hope you’ve enjoyed this year’s recipes and I’ll see you next year with more recipe postings.
The origin of this recipe was the Amaretto Fudge Cheesecake recipe from cooking.com, whose site no longer exists. I made this dessert once before (a few Christmas’ ago) more or less as in the original recipe. My 2015 recipe version definitely came out delicious after making changes to the original, which included drastically reducing the amount of sugar in the filling. I’m not a fan of overly sweet desserts, so I add the minimal amount of sugar, but everyone has different tastes, so feel free to add more. When making the cookie crust, I’ve found that it’s sufficient to use the entire sandwich cookie (including the filling, which many recipes have you remove) with added flavoring (in this case Kahlúa) rather than adding any additional sugar or butter. I’ve also found that it’s not necessary to bake the crust before adding the cheesecake filling, which saves a step in making this dessert. Finally I added a visual and tasty flourish to the cheesecake by topping it with a flavored ganache (Kahlúa again and it hides any filling surface defects after baking).
Enjoy!

Sunday, December 13, 2015

Grilled Capsicum Wine Chicken Thighs (燒烤紅油辣椒酒鷄髀, Siu1 Haau1 Hung4 Jau4 Laat6 Ziu1 Zau2 Gai1 Bei2)

Copyright © 2015 Douglas R. Wong, all rights reserved.
Ming Teh Food’s brand Capsicum in Red Oil provides a spicy addition to this grilled wine based chicken recipe. Capsicum is finely ground red chili and is sold bottled in oil. The spiciness of the dish depends upon the amount added to the marinade and is a personal preference, so feel free to increase or decrease the amount used. The spiciness of the chili with the red wine go well together in a soy based marinade. The dish is very easy to make and cooking time is fast if chicken thighs are used.
Enjoy!

Thursday, December 10, 2015

Black Bean Chili Oil Snow Pea Lamb Chow Mein (黑豆辣椒油荷蘭豆羊扒炒麵, Hak1 Dau6 Laat6 Ziu1 Jau4 Ho4 Laan4 Dau6 Joeng4 Paa4 Caau2 Min6)

Copyright © 2015 Douglas R. Wong. All rights reserved.
Here’s another lamb loin chop meat recipe, this time using noodles. The dish is slightly spicy through the use of Laoganma brand’s Black Bean Chili Oil. As in the previous lamb loin chop meat recipe, Black Bean Chili Oil Lamb with Bean Curd Sticks (黑豆辣椒油腐竹羊肉, Hak1 Dau6 Laat6 Ziu1 Jau4 Fu6 Zuk1 Joeng4 Juk6), more common (and cheaper) cuts of lamb can be substituted, such as lamb leg or shoulder cut into 2-inch (5 cm.) pieces. Lamb loin chops have two distinct pieces of meat separated by a bone as in a beef T-bone steak. The larger piece of meat is the loin and the smaller is the tenderloin. The two pieces of meat need to be removed from the bone, and then the loin and tenderloin pieces cut thinly using a very sharp knife.
Enjoy!
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