Friday, November 7, 2014

Grilled Ground Chili Garlic Oil Pork Rib Eye Chops

Copyright © 2014 Douglas R. Wong, all rights reserved.
Indirect heat from a charcoal grill is used to roast these spicy pork chops. The pork chops should be cut at least 1-inch (2.5 cm.) thick so that they will stand on their own on the grill grate without the need of a rack to support them. The pork chops are placed on the cool side of the grill (the side opposite the lighted charcoal) with the pork chop’s flat bone on the grill grate, rib bone facing the heat, and fat cap facing up. A rack to support the pork chops will be required if the pork chops are too thin or if the pork chops are cut at an odd angle (so the pork chops will lean to one side or the other, and subsequently fall over during cooking).
Enjoy!

Friday, October 31, 2014

Grilled Dry Rub Pork Baby Back Rib Fried Rice (燒烤排骨炒飯, Siu1 Haau1 Paai4 Gwat1 Caau2 Faan6)

Copyright © 2014 Douglas R. Wong, all rights reserved.
So if you have leftovers from the Grilled Dry Rub Pork Baby Back Ribs recipe and cooked rice, you can remove the meat from the ribs and make fried rice. I added red serrano chili peppers to the dish to spice it up even more, but that can be omitted depending upon your preference for spicy food.
Enjoy!

Hot Fermented Bean Curd Chicken (辣椒腐乳雞, Laat6 Ziu1 Fu6 Jyu5 Gai1)

Copyright © 2014 Douglas R. Wong. All rights reserved.
Fermented bean curd can be purchased with or without chilies. I decided to use the hot version in this dish together with red serrano chili peppers to give the dish an added kick of heat. You can, of course, leave out the added red chili peppers and even use the non-spicy version of fermented bean curd if you don’t like the spiciness of the dish.
Enjoy!

Sunday, October 26, 2014

Hot Bean Sauce Turkey (辣豆辦火雞肉, Laat6 Dau6 Faan6 Fo2 Gai1 Juk6)

Copyright © 2014 Douglas R. Wong. All rights reserved.
Hot bean sauce gives this dish its spiciness. The serrano peppers also contribute to the spiciness, but also help to give the dish some color together with the red bell pepper. The black or cloud ear fungus gives the dish a slight crunchiness which contrasts nicely with the texture of the ground turkey. You can substitute ground pork for the turkey if it’s more convenient and you’ll probably not notice the difference.
Enjoy!

Monday, October 20, 2014

Shredded Spice Tofu Baby Bok Choy Sprouts (五香豆腐絲白菜苗, Ng5 Hoeng1 Dau6 Fu6 Si1 Baak6 Coi3 Miu4)

Copyright © 2014 Douglas R. Wong. All rights reserved.
I posted similar recipes using shredded tofu and long baby bok choy sprouts: Shrimp with Shredded Spice Tofu (五香豆腐絲蝦, Ng5 Hoeng1 Dau6 Fu6 Si1 Haa1), which adds seafood, and Baby Bok Choy Sprouts with Shredded Tofu (白菜苗豆腐絲, Baak6 Coi3 Miu4 Dau6 Fu6 Si1), which uses plain shredded tofu.
Long baby bok choy sprouts resemble spinach in form, but retains its crunch when cooked, and are the young long sprouts of the bok choy plant. The long sprouts go well with shredded tofu which is also long in length. I used spiced shredded tofu instead of the white version, which is more common, to give added flavor to the dish. If you can’t find long baby bok choy sprouts (also called long bok choy muy) at your local Asian supermarket, you can substitute baby bok choy (小白菜, siu2 baak6 coi3). Regular firm tofu, cut into strips, can be substituted for the shredded tofu.
Enjoy!

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Hot Bean Sauce Bitter Melon Chicken (辣豆辦苦瓜雞, Laat6 Dau6 Faan6 Fu2 Gwaa1 Gai1)

Copyright © 2014 Douglas R. Wong. All rights reserved.
The bitterness of the bitter melon goes well with the spiciness of the hot bean sauce in this dish. The other ingredients, the chicken and fried tofu, complete the dish. The bitterness of the bitter melon can be controlled by salting the wet bitter melon pieces for up to 10 minutes; more than 10 minutes and the bitterness is mostly removed, so it doesn’t take the salt too long to remove the bitterness. The salt can be omitted if you like the full bitterness of bitter melon.
Enjoy!

Friday, October 10, 2014

Garam Masala Long Bean Shrimp (胡荽豆角蝦, Wu4 Seoi1 Dau6 Gok3 Haa1)

Copyright © 2014 Douglas R. Wong. All rights reserved.
Garam masala powder is the basis for this dish and I think of it as a spicier version of curry powder. I think I got the translation into Chinese correct for garam masala, but I’m not certain. The use of prepared curry powder is common in Cantonese American dishes, so the use of garam masala is a variation on the more common dish that uses curry powder. This is actually a good dish to have over rice.
Enjoy!
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